12
December

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Post by:Super User
  • Spring icon

    As the start of the year begins to melt away and the worst of the weather is behind us it's time to brush off those Winter blues.

    Base: A moisture-wicking baselayer that keeps the body dry is crucial.

    Mid: Keep out your thermal layer if you're out in the mornings, make sure it's easy to remove if the sun breaks out!.

    Shell: Windproof shells are advised, try some with removable arms for added versatility & keep your lightweight rain jacket handy #AprilShowers.

    Legs: Warmer days are setting in but temperature can vary wildly, invest in some leg & arm warmers so you can easily adjust.

    Extremities: Windproof materials for gloves, overshoes etc gives breathability but keeps you warm even if a bit of water gets in.

    Using clothing which is adjustable for different temperatures is essential at this time of year.

    Cycling specific glasses are always a great with interchangable lenses to adapt for those sunny days.

  • Summer icon

    "The days are longer, the evenings are warm and the roads are dry – there’s no better time to be on a bike than in the summer.

    Base: Try out a light baselayer that allows extra air flow over the body - even under a top!.

    Mid: Your mid layer is your top layer now, make sure it's fabric that doesn't hold sweat & short sleeves so you can work on the tan lines.

    Shell: If you're needing a shell now then it had better be light weight & very breathable.

    Legs: Time to get your legs out, wear those cycling short proudly & invest in great tan lines.

    Extremities: Fingerless gloves help keep grip even with sweaty hands.

    While you can wear a t-shirt when you go cycling, you'll soon drown in your own sweat. Better to wear a specific cycling jersey made from a breathable fabric.

    How your kit looks is purely personal preference. From team replica kit, understated but stylish branded wear all the way through to casual commuting and mountain bike clothing.

  • Autumn icon

    The season brings with it a mixed bag of weather: Blue sky days, frosty mornings, torrential rain showers and gale force winds.

    Base: A moisture-wicking baselayer that keeps the body dry is crucial.

    Mid: Only the colder days should warrant an extra thermal layer, have a look at some of the fleece lined shells available.

    Shell: Windproof jackets should provide wind stopping coverage to the belly, chest and shoulders – core areas you need to keep warm.

    Legs: You loose little heat through your legs so 3/4 length shorts will keep them turning nicely.

    Extremities: Long finger gloves, thermal socks and a neck warmer for colder days will ensure you're comfortable as cooler weather moves in.

    Because the weather can’t make its mind up, layers are the key. Air is trapped between each layer of clothing, helping to keep you warm, add or remove layers to help regulate body temperature.

  • Winter icon

    Don't suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) during winter, get out here and ride!

    Base: A moisture-wicking baselayer that keeps the body dry is crucial.

    Mid: A thermal layer worn over your baselayer will keep the warmth in, but should work with the base and shell to let sweat vapour out.

    Shell: Softshell / Windproof and waterproof jackets should provide wind stopping coverage to the belly, chest and shoulders – core areas you need to keep warm.

    Legs: Full-length trousers or bib tights are an essential as they incorporate windstopper or full waterproof fabrics to stop your legs cooling and cramping.

    Extremities: Look after them: a fleece beanie that covers your ears; windproof gloves and outer protection overshoes can make all the difference!

    With these few must-haves you can train outdoors in all but the worst conditions. Quality clothing isn't cheap but proves a great investment; a solid winter’s training is priceless. Be positive in your approach – do it despite the weather, not because of the weather.

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